A night at Searcys- Harissa mayo, chips and champagne

I like to think our tea room is a bit unique. Although it’s only open two days a week, the food doesn’t get rolled over. If it doesn’t sell, it gets eaten by us or given to the wildlife (foxy and badger do well). Now some argue this isn’t good for the accounts, but it’s better for the costumers and gives me loads of stuff to use for blogs. This week we had about 4 jackets left over on Sunday, so I decided to make some wedges.  The only tricky bit was what to have with them.

Well, I’m a bit of a superstitious person. If I’m test flying I give the ground team my mobile and if I’m in London I always have champagne and chips with spicy mayo at Searcys at St Pancras Station. This started when I took and passed my first surgical exam!! With results of the second exam out and a pass achieved, I thought I might give making the spicy mayo a go. It’s flavoured with harissa and amazing with chips and a glass of Verve.

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Harissa mayo

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Ingredients

  • 1 egg yolk
  • 125ml olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon White wine vinegar
  • Salt & pepper
  • 1 teaspoon each of caraway, cumin and coriander seeds
  • 2 teaspoons chilli flakes
  • 2 cloves fresh garlic
  • Jacket potatoes – for the wedges

 

Start by checking you have all the ingredients ready and also a friend on hand to help. Luckily dad’s around.

Start by separating the egg, you only need the yolk so you can either throw away the white or use it in something else. Transfer this to a bowl and gently whisk to break up.  Now the fun begins, add the oil a drop at a time and whisk till fully mixed.

 

Mayo at this point will split if you add the oil too fast and it doesn’t get incorporated. You can save it by adding another egg yolk if it does split.

Continue adding the oil a drop at a time (hence the need for dad) until the mix starts to thicken up. Then add the vinegar – it helps to stabilise the mayo.

 

Now, using your assistant again add the remaining oil in a continuous slow stream whilst frantically whisking. What results is homemade mayo – you can add some mustard, salt and pepper to make lively normal mayo or……..add harissa paste to make something special.

 

Harissa is sort of like a spicy North African ketchup alternative. It’s made by combining Caraway, Cumin and coriander seeds and gently toasting in a dry pan for a couple of minutes. These are then added to the chilli and ground up in a pestle and mortar.

 

Then add the finely chopped garlic and grind again in the trusty pestle and mortar. You can add a bit of oil to form a paste at the end.

 

All that remains is to combine the mayo with the Harissa paste and fold together.

 

Let’s eat

Make a few wedges with the left over jacket potatoes by chopping into 8 and cooking on the Aga in a bit of oil. Season with some salt and pepper.

 

Serve the wedges with a little ramekin of the mayo, a few olives and some perfectly chilled champagne (Jennie gets Verve, Alice-Moet, Holly edged towards Rothschild but when it’s just me – Pommery)

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Dr Cox @ The Supper Club – Chicken Flowerpot Pie

To date I’ve held 4 Supper clubs – After the first 2 I had a waiting list approx. 4x longer than the number of spaces available. So, let’s see how fast this one sells out……….

Do you recall the 4th July post when I made Pretzels to celebrate the beer renowned Jazz musician/brewer Greg Maskalic made? Well, on 18th Nov we will be teaming up, Greg on Piano and myself on the AGA. The menu will be delicious food, cooked well and you can even bring your own alcohol. What’s not to love?

Menu

Nibbles to start

Homemade Chicken Pie

Pulled Pork Topped Burger with Rosemary chips

Vegetarian Chill with a homemade cornbread

A selection of Deserts

Coffee with Homemade Chocolates

Over the next few weeks I’ll put up a couple of the recipes. But for now here’s Homemade chicken pie – cooked in a flowerpot obviously.

 

Chicken Flowerpot Pie

 

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Ingredients

  • 1 medium chicken
  • 2 onions
  • Carrots
  • Peas
  • Good quality chicken stock
  • 8oz Plain Floour
  • 4oz Butter – plus a little more for the chicken
  • Olive oil
  • Sage, Thyme, salt and pepper.

Start by preparing the chicken. Start by rubbing in a couple of teaspoons of olive oil. Then top with butter and the herbs and rub into the skin.

Chicken has a lovely taste on its own if cooked well, so theere’s no need to drown the flavours.  Roast in an over at around 170 till the leg can be pulled off cleanly.

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This normally takes around 1hr 20mins – but obviously this will vary with size. Once it’s cooked, let the bird rest and then strip off the meat.IMG_0673

With the meat ready it’s time to get on with the rest of the filling. Finely chop an onion and soften on a medium heat. Whilst this softens, peel and chop a couple of carrots and cut into small cubes – boil for 10 mins till soft.

To the softened onions, add the torn chicken and the chicken stock. You can also add a dash of wine at this point as well.  Reduce the stock down in the pan till a lovely rich filling has been created.

Ok, confession time. The pies should have carrots and peas in them, and will for the supper club, but I’m not a fan of Veg. They taste better with them in though………….

 

Pastry Cases

Whilst the chicken cooks, multitask and make the pastry. It’s just a basic shortcrust. Start by weighing out the butter and plain flour with a pinch of salt.

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Add these to the mixer and rub in the butter – Of course you can do this by hand but it takes a lot longer. Use a couple of tablespoons of cold water to bring the pastry together.

Wrap the pastry in cling film and leave to chill in the fridge for an hour – it needs the time to rest, otherwise it’s just rubbery and tough.

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Roll out the pastry on a well floured board – ideally you should only roll away from yourself, rotating the pastry each time – but in reality everyone does it differently. You are aiming for about a £1 coin thickness

Then line the well greased flowerpots with the pastry, trim around the top and leave to rest again for another hour. The resting stops the pastry shrinking back in the oven.

Once rested, fill with baking beans and cook in the AGA (approx 180) for 10mins before removing the beans and giving the pastry another 5mins to crisp up – No soggy bottoms here…………….

 

Pie Time

Right, on the home straight now.

Fill the pastry cases with the pie filling, roll out a lid and use a little egg wash to attach to the case. Then with a fork, gently crimp around the top of the pie. Make a small hole to allow the steam to escape. Glaze the top of the pie with egg wash and bake for 30mins at around 180C, until golden.

Serve with some rosemary chips and minty mushy peas. The wine and flowers of optional.

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So there we have it. The first teaser of Supper Club. If you fancy coming for the food or more likely the wonderful Jazz music, pop in.

 

Infinity Project 861: Time to make beer

In the depths of winter I sat in the snug, the heavy smell of paraffin mixed with that of pie and Bass. We sat opposite a hero, talking about what we had just flown, the roar of 27L of British thunder still buzzing in our ears

My friends have accused me of being old fashioned throughout the years, however I just insist that some things can’t be improved upon. There is a pub which exemplifies this point. Located deep in Lincolnshire approx. 5miles from a ‘disused’ airfield, it was once the haunt of brave young men who fought to keep us free. A few miles have been added to the clocks of these old boys, but the pub remains the same. Lit only by oil lamps, pies kept warm in an oil fired cabinet and no lager to be seen on the taps, it became a favourite of the MMDS during my final years at school and beyond. Its mystery, unlike so much else, never faded………………..

During one of those hazy evenings, after adding a few more hours to my log book, I sat with my two closest friends, Ginger (sadly no longer with us) and Morley, and said no matter what happened we must not let these echoes of the past slip away. Afterall

“Memory is the storeroom of the mind. A dusty attic of experience filled with knowledge; sometimes useless; sometimes priceless.But once in a while we must cast aside the shades, and with our dustily relics try to recapture the past. For in there lies reason for the present and hope for the future”

Let’s face it, most men have wanted to brew their own beer. A few will have tried with homebrew kits and got varying results. So, in memory of Ginger I thought it was finally time I gave brewing a go and keep the memory of those MMDS trips alive.

Here is to hope for the future: Oil Lamps, homemade pies and beer………..

Micro Brewery

There is one undisputed king of beers, Bass! It is a very drinkable, lightly hopped English pale ale and in reality should only be drunk in half so you can keep going back for more. It’s also got the worlds first trademark, a red triangle which I learnt on a trip to the Bass museum a few weeks ago.

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Wandering around the museum, beer in hand, I stumbled upon an elderly gentleman lurking around what appeared to be bunch of barrels and a trough. Trying to work out what it was I finally asked him, he explained it was part of the BurtonUnion system once used to brew beer. These turned out to be needlessly complicated and most were scrapped in the 50s, but as the elderly gentleman told me, beer tastes better brewed in them (I know the science but don’t ask)………….

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One thing the MMDS members realised is don’t get me drunk and let me loose near something mechanical, I can revise engineer it in minutes. So, I did!!!! And thus with the use of meccano, tubing, an old ban Marie and a couple of 5L mini kegs, a Miniature Burton Union was made as well as a mash tun and sparging equipment…………..

Homemade Bass

Beer is made using malt, hops, water and yeast. It’s then left to ferment and after about 2 weeks you transfer into casks to condition for another 2 weeks. You can buy good malt extracts but I wanted to keep mine as close to the original as possible so I am using malt. The yeast is one I managed to propagate from a pint of Bass from my local as well to make it even more authentic.

Ingredience

  •  4oz Crystal malt
  • 3lb Pale malt
  • Water
  • Yeast
  • 7oz Brewers sugar
  • 0.4oz + 0.16oz + 0.1oz Goulding hops
  • 0.8oz Fugggles hops
  • Irish moss
  • Fining

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Start by allowing the malt to mash in approx 7L of water. This should be kept at a steady 66c and the malt being agitated from time to time to allow full exposure to the water. This can be done by sealing the malt in a cloth bag and steeping it like a giant tea bag. Or if you have a lot of spare meccano you can build a system to suspend the malt in to baskets which then pump the water constantly over it. This needs to continue for 1.5hrs to allow full extraction.

After 1.5hrs have passed (and you’ve repaired the pump a few times), you need to drain the liquid into a pan of boiler for the next step. But you haven’t finished with the malt just yet. This is still covered in lots of natural sugar which are removed in a process called sparging. Basically you pass warm water over the malt and collect this for boiling. I again used the recycling system to spare the grain. You need approx 3L in total.

You should have now collected approx 10L of liquid which is known as wort. This contains the sugars which will be converted into alcohol by the yeast. This needs to be flavoured and the bitterness added by hops. This occurs in 2 steps. Firstly the Fuggles hops and the first batch of Golding hops are added  and the wort boiled for 1.5hr along with the Irish moss. The helps keep the beer clear.

 

Then, just at the end more flavouring aromatic  Golding hops are added and the liquid allowed to steep for 10-15mins.

The wort now needs to be cooled rapidly to stop the high temperature degrading the delicate flavour of the hops. This can be done by passing the wort through a length of tubing submersed in a sink of ice cold water. The aim is to reduce it down to 20-25, so it can take a few passes. Sugar can then be added to reach a target specific cavity of 1.045.

 

Once cooled, the yeast can be added and then the mixture transferred to the Union.
The idea of a Burton Union is that as the yeast ferments it produces gas, alcohol, but also a foam on the top. This is forced up the copper swan pipe and into a trough at the top. This trough collects yeast and fermenting beer which is then returned to the Union Barrells. This not only allows you to not waste beer (a sin) but also allows the yeast strains to be uniform throughout all the barrels.

Now it’s just a case of waiting.

After 2 weeks the Unions will slow down their production and the Specific gravity will have fallen to around 1.020. Now you have technically got beer but it’s very young and needs to be conditioned. More barrels to the rescue. Transfer the beer via siphon to the aging casks avoiding transferring all the sediment which will have collected at the base. To the beer, add a priming liquid of water and sugar and more Golding hops (I had some spare pellet type so used them-not a great fan). Also you can add the finings at this point to aid in clearing.

Again wait- 2 weeks till you can drink.

So after 2 weeks,the beer is ready for tapping. Ideally you should keep in a cool room or cupboard and leave a day for it to settle if you move it. Remove the cap and plug the hole with a breathable material, like soft wood. Recap if you finish drinking but not done finishing the barrel.

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The big question is what to drink it with………. Memories oh dearest memories – Steak and Ale pie I think 😉